Is Jerusalem a safe city?

Keyword: Jerusalem

The place has been since the 4th millennium BC. Settled. King David conquered Jerusalem in the 10th century BC. From the hand of the original inhabitants of the country. He made it the capital of his kingdom, which included the two originally independent parts of Judah in the south and Israel in the north (cf. 2 Samuel 5: 6-9). Jerusalem was therefore given the nickname "City of David" or "City of David".

David's son and successor, King Solomon, had the temple and a royal palace built, making the city the architecturally center of the country. When, after his death, the kingdom split up again into the two parts Israel (northern kingdom) and Judah (southern kingdom), Jerusalem became the capital of Judah.

After the fall of the northern empire in 722 BC The city experienced a heyday under King Hezekiah (727-699 BC). Numerous refugees from the north came to Jerusalem, which led to an increase in the population and brisk construction activity. In addition, the city was re-fortified under Hezekiah and an underground canal, the so-called Shiloah tunnel, was built. He should also provide the city with drinking water in the event of a siege.

Hezekiah made Jerusalem the religious center of the land because he severely restricted the making of sacrifices outside the temple. These reform measures were continued by the later King Joschiah: only sacrifices were allowed to be made in the Jerusalem temple service. In addition, the worship service was freed from the influences of foreign religions and cults.

When the Assyrian king Sennacherib besieged the city, according to the accounts of the Bible it was saved from destruction by a miracle of God. This strengthened the belief that the city was under God's special protection, a safe place that could not be taken by the enemy. The people were deeply affected when Jerusalem in 586 BC. Was conquered and destroyed by the Babylonians under the leadership of their king Nebuchadnezzar II. The prophets saw in the destruction of the city and the temple the judgment of God over king and people, because they had not lived according to God's commandments. After returning from exile in Babylonia, the city and temple were rebuilt, albeit more modestly.

At the time of the New Testament, Jerusalem was one of the most beautiful cities in the entire region. Herod the Great (37-4 BC) renewed the royal palace and had a new magnificent temple built. Many pilgrims flocked to the city for the big festivals, which brought it again to fame and fortune. Above all, the temple and the seat of the Jewish Council contributed to Jerusalem becoming the religious and spiritual center of Judaism of that time.

In AD 70, the city and temple were destroyed by the Romans when they put down the first Jewish uprising. After the second Jewish uprising, Jerusalem was razed to the ground in 135 AD, but then rebuilt under the name Aelia Capitolina.

The Gospels know Jerusalem as the place of Jesus' suffering until his death. According to the Gospel of Luke, Jerusalem is also the place where the risen Jesus appears to his disciples (cf. Luke 24: 36-49). It was here that the first Christian congregation arose, which met for worship in houses and lived in close communion (cf. Acts 2: 42-47).

Shortly before the outbreak of the Jewish War in AD 66-70, the early community left Jerusalem and moved to Pella in the East Bank.

The maps for Paul's journeys are based on what Luke reports in the book of Acts. Information in the letters of Paul himself make it possible or necessary here and there to reconstruct another picture of the processes.

The maps for Paul's journeys are based on what Luke reports in the book of Acts. Information in the letters of Paul himself make it possible or necessary here and there to reconstruct another picture of the processes.

The maps for Paul's journeys are based on what Luke reports in the Acts of the Apostles. Information in the letters of Paul himself make it possible or necessary here and there to reconstruct another picture of the processes.

The maps for Paul's journeys are based on what Luke reports in the book of Acts. Information in the letters of Paul himself make it possible or necessary here and there to reconstruct another picture of the processes.

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