Eating cooks away

Going vegan - 5 tips for eating out

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A trip to a restaurant with the family is coming up or you are out with friends and someone spontaneously makes the suggestion to go out for a meal ...

What is your first thought

Once you feel the horror of this idea and are wondering how you can get through this situation as perhaps the only vegan in the group, then by all means stick with it now!

Because in this post I'll tell you how you can also eat vegan outside. I will also give you tips what you can order delicious in the restaurantto get your money's worth like everyone else. And not having to settle for dry lettuce leaves or French fries with ketchup while everyone else at the table looks at you pityingly and explains to you that they could never be vegan ...

Vegan on the go - How you can also eat vegan when you are out

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Veganism is becoming more and more popular and word has got around in industry and gastronomy that there are people who eat a purely plant-based diet. Restaurants are offering more and more vegan options and more and more purely vegan restaurants are opening up, especially in large cities. In Berlin, depending on the district, you can find vegan (or vegan-friendly) restaurants, cafés, snack bars, ice cream parlors, etc. on every other corner. But not all of us live in Berlin or any other vegan-friendly city.

Even in places where such paradisiacal circumstances do not prevail, as a vegan you can find something edible in most "normal" restaurants! Sometimes it takes more effort and in other cases less effort. But often it's not as bad as you think and one thing is certain: You definitely don't have to go hungry :)

Go vegan - tip 1: choose the right restaurant!

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To eat delicious vegan, you don't necessarily have to dine in a vegan restaurant. That would of course be the best for you, but depending on the group you're in, not everyone might want to eat vegan. This is often the case with colleagues or relatives. If your companion is open to it, then of course nothing speaks against a purely vegan restaurant.

You can find vegan or vegetarian or veggie-friendly shops via Happy Cow and Vanilla Bean (also in combination with Google and Tripadvisor).

But don't worry if there aren't any vegan shops near you. Whether you are going to a restaurant with the family, planning a company party or you want to meet up with friends for dinner - Ideally, you have a say in the selection of the restaurant or you alone make the decision,if possible. In this way you can search for shops with a vegan offer, in which mixed foodists, vegetarians and vegans get their money's worth.

Go vegan - Tip 2: Inquire in advance!

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If you don't have a say in restaurant choices, there are also a few ways to find out what to eat. First of all, if I were you, I would search for the restaurant online and see if there is a menu on the website. So you can get an overview of the potentially vegan offer.

If you can't find any vegan options at first glance, you can take the second step call the restaurant and just ask politely. Vegetarian dishes can often be prepared very easily using only two changes. Alternatively, the chef may be able to conjure up something vegan for you that is not on the restaurant's menu. Some chefs are even happy about this variety and the opportunity to get creative.

Otherwise it is of course also possible to get active in the restaurant and explain to the waitress what you want or don't want to eat, or even ask about the cook. Often, however, the staff is very busy and possibly even stressed, so I would rather advise you to discuss the whole thing in advance (by phone or in person if you live or work nearby) and in peace. In this way you can avoid unpleasant situations or unpleasant surprises on site.

If you have the feeling that you are not being taken seriously, in the worst case you can pretend an allergy. While I'm not a fan of this strategy, in some cases your request will be taken more seriously. I've also been in situations where I've played it safe with this method, and it actually worked.

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Go vegan - tip 3: think solution-oriented and get creative!

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To be friendly and respectful when communicating your concerns is a matter of course, which I will not go into further here. How it echoes into the forest and so ...

I also advise you to stay relaxed and relaxed as well to think in a solution-oriented manner. Instead of getting upset that there aren't any vegan options, you could suggest something yourself. Don't just list what you don't eat, but share your ideas with the staff on site - especially if you see that your request is overwhelming.

For example, you could scan the menu and pick out the dishes that are easy to veganize. Ideally, you have concrete change requestsFor example, whether you could use vegetable oil instead of butter, coconut milk instead of cream, tofu instead of meat, etc. If that's not that easy to do, you could ask for it too Put together a main course plate from various starters and / or side dishes. I think you understand the principle.

Go vegan - Tip 4: Don't hide and increase the demand

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If you've managed to get a delicious vegan meal, please don't forget to praise and encourage people to offer (more) vegan options. Unfortunately, the world will not become vegan overnight, but there is definitely already a trend towards more and more vegan offers. Each of us can contribute to this and by requesting vegan options increase demand. And, as is well known, the supply increases with the demand.

So what you should definitely not do (if not absolutely necessary) is to hide! Communicate openly that you are vegan and always ask! Because if you don't ask, you've already lost.

Going out vegan - Tip 5: What you can eat as a vegan in a restaurant

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So, now let's take a look at what you can eat as a vegan in a restaurant. Often it is not as difficult as we imagine. Some dishes are “by chance” already vegan, many dishes can be easily veganized with just a few changes. The Asian, Italian and Indian cuisine in particular have a lot to offer. But you can also find something in a more difficult context, such as a visit to an inn with typical German cuisine.

In the following overview I present a few Ideas for vegan dishes for the various national kitchens in front. This list does not claim to be complete and you are welcome to add additions to the comments!

Better to ask than let the food go back!

When ordering, you should always clearly communicate that you want the vegan version without any animal products. Because often animal ingredients are hidden in dishes that seem vegan, such as milk in pizza dough, clarified butter in Indian curries, fish sauce in Asian dishes, etc.

If you have the feeling that the staff does not understand the concept of "vegan" one hundred percent, you can also use aids to explain it simply. For example the "vegan display board" from my friends and blogger colleagues Dani and Sebastian from kohlundkarma. This useful graphic shows which ingredients should not be in your food or drink.

Vegan at the Italian

  • Vegan salads
  • Pizza bread (without milk)
  • Bruschetta (freshly toasted bread) with a tomato and garlic topping
  • Vegan antipasti (vegetables pickled in olive oil such as eggplant, zucchini, peppers, mushrooms)
  • Minestrone without pancetta and parmesan (Italian vegetable soup)
  • Vegan pasta (without egg), e.g.

    • Pomodoro (oil, fresh tomatoes and basil)
    • Napoli (tomato sauce)
    • Aglio e olio (garlic and oil)
    • Arrabbiata without bacon (tomato and chilli)
      with vegetable sauce (if available)
    • Pizza with vegetables and no cheese (or with vegan cheese you bring with you)

Vegan at the Spaniard

  • Tapas, e.g.
     
    • Patatas Bravas (fried potato cubes with spicy tomato sauce)
    • marinated peppers
    • Mushrooms with garlic
    • fried eggplant or peppers
    • Judias Verde (green beans with onions and garlic)
  • Piriñaca (southern Spanish salad)
  • Gazpacho (cold vegetable soup)
  • Vegan Paella (Spanish rice dish from the pan)

VEGAN IN THE INDIAN

  • Samosas (dumplings with vegetable filling)
  • Pakoras (vegetables fried in chickpea flour)
  • Papadums (Indian flatbread made from chickpea or lentil flour)
  • Vegan chapati bread
  • Vegan naan bread
  • Dhal (lentil stew)
  • vegan biryani (rice dish with onions, nuts, raisins and chili)
  • Vegetable curry
  • Chana Masala (vegetable dish with chickpeas)
  • Bhindi Masala (vegetable dish with okra pods)

Vegan at the Japanese

  • Miso soup (without fish flakes)
  • Seaweed salad
  • Edamame
  • Tempura (fried vegetables)
  • Bean sprout salad with sesame seeds
  • Vegetarian sushi rolls, e.g. with avocado, cucumber, radish, tofu

Vegan in a German inn

  • Vegan salad
  • fried or steamed vegetables
  • Clear vegetable soups
  • Fried potatoes, boiled potatoes without butter or French fries
  • Franconian potato salad (without mayonnaise)
  • Baked potatoes with vegetables (without quark)
  • Potato pancakes with applesauce
  • vegetables buffer
  • Apple strudel without butter or egg
  • fruit salad

VEGAN IN GREEK

  • Vegan salads (e.g. Greek salad without feta or coleslaw)
  • Mezedes (starters), e.g.

    • Gigantes (baked giant beans in tomato sauce)
    • Dolmadakia (vine leaves stuffed with rice)
    • grilled vegetables like eggplant, zucchini or peppers
  • Gemista (baked peppers or tomatoes with rice filling)
  • Kritharahki (risotto-like noodle dish)

VEGAN IN ORIENTAL CUISINE

  • Falafel (fried balls made from pureed chickpeas
  • Couscous (balls made from durum wheat semolina)
  • Tabbouleh (bulgur salad)
  • Pita bread with hummus (chickpea cream)
  • Baba Ghanoush (eggplant cream)
  • Ful (bean cream)
  • Marinated vegetables
  • filled dumplings
  • filled aubergine
  • Vine leaves with rice filling

VEGAN IN CHINESE

  • Spring rolls with vegetable filling
  • Vegetable soups
  • Rice noodle salad
  • fried rice with vegetables without egg
  • fried noodles with vegetables without egg
  • fried tofu
  • Wok vegetables
  • Buddhist Lent Food (dish consists of fresh vegetables, tofu and rice)

VEGAN BY THAI COUNTRIES

  • Tom Ka Puk “soup with coconut milk and vegetables
  • Pan-fried vegetables with tofu
  • Vegan Thai curry
  • Papaya salad (without shrimp and with soy sauce instead of fish sauce)
  • Mango sticky rice with coconut milk

Vegan at the Mexican

  • Vegan salads
  • Nachos (tortilla chips) with salsa (tomato and chili sauce)
  • Tacos (rolled up tortilla made from wheat or corn), e.g. filled with beans, onions, peppers, tomatoes,
  • Burritos (wraps) with salsa (spicy tomato dip)
  • Fajitas (open wheat tortilla) with vegan filling
  • Enchiladas (tortillas filled with sauce)
  • Quesadillas without cheese with vegan filling (closed tortilla)
  • Guacamole (avocado cream)
  • Sweet potato fries
  • Vegan rice dishes
  • vegetable skewers

Vegan at the African

  • Injera (sourdough flatbread made from gluten-free teff)
  • cooked potatoes
  • cooked spinach
  • White cabbage soup
  • Okra pods
  • Stew made from beans, lentils or chickpeas
  • Millet stir-fry

I hope I was able to help you with my tips and ideas and I wish you a nice visit to the restaurant with your family, friends or colleagues - without any stress about food.

I am curious: What are your experiences with eating out? Encourage other Iss Happy readers and report on your positive experiences or share your challenges and get further valuable tips!

More tips and assistance:

  • You will receive tips on how to act as the only vegan at family celebrations and on special occasions such as Christmas dinner here.
  • In this one, I'll tell you tips on how to eat vegan and healthy food while traveling Video.
  • In this one, I'll give you tips for vegan take-away meals Recipe collectionin front.