What does each belt mean in BJJ

Results 1 to 15 of 21
  1. 11-07-2019, 09:41#1
    Date of registration
    26.08.2001
    place
    Berlin
    Age
    56
    Contributions
    43.484
    Blog posts
    12

    Why are belts so important in the BJJ?

    In another thread, Christian asked this question:

    Quote by Eskrima-Düsseldorf
    I don't know of any martial art - in which there is really fighting - in which the color of the belt is taken so seriously. Why is that?
    Yeah so why?

    I don't train in any other martial art with belts, so it's hard to compare.
    And as a subordinate clause: in many other martial arts that I know and fight in, there is something like a belt ... be it a ranking or certain titles. Sometimes much more.

    So why is the BJJ belt important to me personally?

    (First of all: a new belt was never important to me, I trained out of the "learning" motivation. But that does not mean that I was not proud of every belt that I was awarded.)

    But the belt represents a lot for me. In the BJJ we fight, save, sweat, work hard and bleed every day. All of this is in there for me somehow (no, I wash my belt). There are also various competitions, victories and defeats.

    For me it is also a symbol of a learning development. I know what level my belts are at, what they can do, what they are currently learning. It's like being promoted to a school class.

    What other thoughts are there on that?

  2. 11-07-2019, 10:47#2
    Date of registration
    02.09.2001
    place
    Rhine Main Area
    Contributions
    7.689

    In general, people love graduations, in many commercial martial arts a lot of money is made with them and new graduations are invented again and again.

    In the BJJ, the belt was always a sign of personal development for me, but also of the time and all the things that I have sacrificed to the sport.

    These are actually my two criteria when I test people.

    How did your personal development go?

    What sacrifices did you make for your training?

    One has become technically better, the other combative and the other may have less talent, but sacrifices 3 evenings a week, year after year, to sport .....

    That kind of thing plays a role for me.

  3. 11-07-2019, 10:50#3
    Date of registration
    14.08.2015
    Age
    36
    Contributions
    207

    I train BJJ and judo. Judo under Rambat thus with an allocation principle based on actual ability (although of course subjectively assessed by the teacher) as in the BJJ. I used to train and graduate with the usual audition exams at the DJB.

    Imho there are several reasons why the different belt colors are felt to be so important in the BJJ.

    1. The allocation rhythm is completely different. In other belt arts, the color belts are just a transitional phase before the black belt. Even the 1st dan is still a student in Judo, for example. Only from around the 3rd Dan is it actually a "master" or "teacher" level. But of course the belts from the 1st Dan are black.
    In the BJJ it's completely different. You can definitely speak of a teacher degree from brown, but at the latest from the black belt. The visible belt color is simply more informative for the expected ability of the wearer. I would roughly estimate that a 1st dan in judo equates to a fresh purple belt or even experienced blue belt in BJJ.

    2. Is the awarding practice in the BJJ much more closely related to actual skills. In judo (and even more so in other afaik arts) it is absolutely possible to achieve a black belt without actually being able to do anything. Practicing kata and drying techniques optimized for exams is absolutely sufficient here. You have to put in a lot of work, but it is absolutely feasible to get to the black belt without real skill. Every now and then you meet black belts who have nothing on the Randori and cannot teach anything meaningful because they did not understand the principles.
    Conversely, there are many judoka who do not do the Punch and Judy theater of the Dan exams with compulsory preparatory courses, etc. There are plenty of capable judoka in Germany who have been wearing their brown belts for 5-10-20 years.
    Being able to do so on the mat is only indirectly related to the color of the belt. This is different in the BJJ (or at least not as pronounced for a long time).

    These two factors together mean that the black belt in the BJJ is surrounded by a completely different symbolism and "mysticism" than in other disciplines. With a BJJ Blackbelt, I automatically assume that he knows what he is talking about when it comes to grappling, that he can roll and teach me a technique that makes sense. This is not necessarily the case in karate or judo.

    That's why I'm also fundamentally against standardized exams in the BJJ.

  4. 11-07-2019, 11:41#4
    Date of registration
    31.03.2018
    place
    Mönchengladbach
    Age
    44
    Contributions
    43

  5. 11-07-2019, 13:31#5
    Date of registration
    19.04.2015
    Age
    44
    Contributions
    422

    Quote by jkdberlin
    In another thread, Christian asked this question:



    Yeah so why?

    I don't train in any other martial art with belts, so it's hard to compare.
    And as a subordinate clause: in many other martial arts that I know and fight in, there is something like a belt ... be it a ranking or certain titles. Sometimes much more.

    So why is the BJJ belt important to me personally?

    (First of all: a new belt was never important to me, I trained out of the "learning" motivation. But that does not mean that I was not proud of every belt that I was awarded.)

    But the belt represents a lot for me. In the BJJ at least we fight, save, sweat, work hard and bleed every now and then. All of this is somehow in there for me (no, I wash my belt). There are also various competitions, victories and defeats.

    For me it is also a symbol of a learning development. I know what level my belts are at, what they can do, what they are currently learning. It's like being promoted to a school class.

    What other thoughts are there on that?
    You wrote that nicely, Frank!
    One of my former BJJ teachers always summed up in 3 words what the belt and the award means for him: "Knowledge, skills and attitude" .... fits my opinion quite well. Personally, I never worked towards a belt in the BJJ, but, like you Frank, generated my motivation myself by learning on the mat. Of course, I was still proud when I got a strap or a strap ... It's also recognition, assessment of the skills and trust of the teacher.
    Changed by 1.2.3 (11-07-2019 at 13:59)

  6. 11-07-2019, 14:08#6
    Date of registration
    27.05.2002
    place
    Mönchengladbach
    Contributions
    9.292
    Blog posts
    1

    Thanks for the thread, very interesting

    Sent from my moto g (6) play with Tapatalk

  7. 13-07-2019, 18:57#7
    Date of registration
    14.12.2008
    place
    Constance / Zurich
    Contributions
    1.016

    Personally, I reject graduations with regard to financial interest and withholding "knowledge" and "techniques" due to a lack of graduation, and that's why I probably moved away from the JKD at that time and towards Silat.
    I can see that it makes sense for you to go to competitions or a friendly chevron - but there will probably be nasty surprises if the coach is after the money, right?

    I think you can divide practitioners into several categories, some just always need something they can work towards and graduations are certainly a nice thing and have their justification.

    VG;
    Phelan

  8. 13-07-2019, 19:00#8
    Date of registration
    26.06.2017
    place
    Behind the seven mountains, with the seven dwarfs
    Age
    56
    Contributions
    1.979

    Quote by Phelan
    Personally, I reject graduations with regard to financial interest and withholding "knowledge" and "techniques" due to lack of graduation
    Uh ... what?
    I have no idea what you mean by that

    Please formulate again in general terms that are understandable to blondes!

  9. 13-07-2019, 19:02#9
    Date of registration
    02.09.2001
    place
    Rhine Main Area
    Contributions
    7.689

    I would say in the BJJ there is no withholding of knowledge. You can watch the best fighters in the world on the internet every day, every tournament, Gi, No-Gi. There are no technical secrets. There are subtleties and details, but most beginners aren't ready for them anyway, and if they are advanced enough, they will learn them too.

    What should a BJJ teacher do with his blue belts? Not showing them techniques so they can go to a tournament and get tapped because they never learned the techniques in their school? That doesn't make any sense.

    There are bought belts in the BJJ, no question about it, but technology is not a means of pressure to earn money with it, nobody in the BJJ believes in secret technologies

  10. 13-07-2019, 19:05#10
    Date of registration
    14.12.2008
    place
    Constance / Zurich
    Contributions
    1.016

    Quote by Ripley
    Uh ... what?
    I have no idea what you mean by that

    Please formulate again in general terms that are understandable to blondes!
    Technique A is only shown after belt 1, before that only the group of "A-belts" is shown, the others are simply not taught in it or distributed to another date.

  11. 13-07-2019, 19:13#11

    Quote by Phelan
    Technique A is only shown after belt 1, before that only the group of "A-belts" is shown, the others are simply not taught in it or distributed to another date.
    That doesn't "normally" exist in bjj.
    Exceptions might confirm the rule here, but otherwise just take a look at what Björn wrote here.

    Greetings1789

  12. 13-07-2019, 20:57#12
    Date of registration
    14.05.2008
    place
    Santos (SaoPaulo / Brazil)
    Contributions
    2.995

    Quote by Bjorn Friedrich
    I would say in the BJJ there is no withholding of knowledge. You can watch the best fighters in the world on the internet every day, every tournament, Gi, No-Gi. There are no technical secrets. There are subtleties and details, but most beginners aren't ready for them anyway, and if they are advanced enough, they will learn them too.

    What should a BJJ teacher do with his blue belts? Not showing them techniques so they can go to a tournament and get tapped because they never learned the techniques in their school? That doesn't make any sense at all.

    There are bought belts in the BJJ, no question about it, but technology is not a means of pressure to earn money with it, nobody in the BJJ believes in secret technologies
    Sorry, not really !? "We" were once a day guest at Casquinhas (Alliance) Academy in SP
    There was a big difference between the "seat belt classes" and what was shown to the competition team

  13. 13-07-2019, 21:05#13
    Date of registration
    02.09.2013
    place
    Lübeck
    Contributions
    3.544

    Keeping techniques secret can only be done for a while. At the latest when they have been successfully used a few times at a tournament, they will end up on the network at some point.

    But I would say that you can leave out some important details. Especially when it comes to invisible Jiu Jitsu (or whatever you want to call it), it is difficult to learn without a teacher. As long as you only train in a gym you are dependent on your teacher.
    "It's embarrassing, but you can still try it out."
    - evolution

  14. 14-07-2019, 10:26#14
    Date of registration
    02.09.2001
    place
    Rhine Main Area
    Contributions
    7.689

    Of course there are the invisible details, but to be honest, 99% of people don't need them anyway because they don't have the physical feeling for them at all ...

    There are subtleties, etc. but a white belt is, for example, well served with the Gracie Combative things and does not need the invisible details from Rickson, even if they would make the execution of the technology itself better .....

    What there is in "Secrets" only helps people who have been in the sport for many years anyway.

    What makes a gym special for beginners is the didactics, teaching structure, practice method, etc.

  15. 14-07-2019, 11:26#15

    Quote by Bjorn Friedrich
    Of course there are the invisible details, but to be honest, 99% of people don't need them anyway because they don't have the physical feeling for them at all ...

    There are subtleties, etc. but a white belt is great for example with the Gracie Combative things and does not need the invisible details from Rickson, even if they would make the execution of the technology better .....

    What there is in "Secrets" only helps people who have been in the sport for many years anyway.

    What makes a gym special for beginners is the didactics, teaching structure, practice method, etc.
    Well, a few details are helpful, even for beginners ...
    You yourself have z. B shown the Kimura from the guard, with a detail that I had never seen anywhere before ...
    And I guess I wasn’t the only one.

    Greetings1789

Go to: Grappling Up
  • Areas
  • User Control Center
  • private messages
  • Subscriptions
  • Who's Online
  • Search forums
  • Forum home page
  • Forums
  • Information & Co
    1. Board rules and board news
    2. Dates & information, courses, seminars, tournaments
      1. Dates & information on courses and seminars
      2. Dates & information on special courses and seminars
      3. Dates & information on tournaments, KK events
      4. Nikolaus Budo course
      5. Benefit events
      6. Seminars outside of Germany
    3. Search: association, school, club, training partner, free group
      1. Training abroad
    4. Schools, clubs, associations, training groups
  • New in the KKB / New in the martial arts
    1. Who am I? - corner
    2. Beginner Questions - The forum for martial arts beginners
  • Martial arts / martial arts
    1. Arnis, Eskrima, Kali
    2. Capoeira, acrobatics in martial arts
      1. Video clip discussions on Capoeira and KK acrobatics
    3. Chinese martial and movement arts
      1. Kung Fu, Wushu, Kuoshu Sanda, Lei Tai
      2. Taijiquan, Qigong-Neigong Tuishou, Baguazhang, Xingyiquan
      3. Event forum Chinese martial and movement arts
      4. Video clips Chinese martial and movement arts
      5. Sinological questions in the Chinaforum
    4. European martial arts
      1. Library - European Martial Arts
    5. Grappling
      1. Video clips grappling
      2. Event forum grappling
    6. Hybrid and SV martial arts
      1. Krav Maga and derivatives
      2. Kempo
      3. Event and seminar reports
      4. Hybrid SV Martial Arts Video Forum
    7. Japanese martial arts
      1. Experience reports / seminar reports
    8. Jeet Kune Thu
    9. Ju-Jutsu
    10. Karate, Kobudō
    11. Kickboxing, muay thai, savate, boxing
      1. Boxing
      2. Kickboxing, Savate, K-1.
      3. Muay Thai, Muay Boran, Krabi Krabong
        1. Experience reports
      4. Event forum boxing, kick-boxing, K1, muay thai
      5. Fighters wanted
    12. Korean martial arts
    13. MMA - Mixed Martial Arts
      1. Event forum MMA
        1. spoiler
      2. Video clip discussions about MMA
    14. Wing Chun / Yong Chun
      1. Wing Chun video clips
      2. Archive Wing Chun / Yong Chun
        1. Archive Wing Chun video clips
  • General information on martial arts / sports
    1. Open martial arts forum
    2. Questions & Answers video forum
      1. Arnis, Eskrima, Kali
      2. Capoeira, acrobatics in martial arts
      3. Chinese martial and movement arts
      4. European martial arts
      5. Grappling
      6. Hybrid and SV martial arts
      7. Japanese martial arts
      8. Jeet Kune Thu
      9. Ju-Jutsu
      10. Karate, Kobudō
      11. Kickboxing, muay thai, savate, boxing