Canadians are more sensitive than Americans

From the Dominion to the Territorial Consummation of the Nation (1867–1918)

Canadian History of Literature pp 71-112 | Cite as

  • Heinz Antor
  • Doris Eibl
  • Klaus-Dieter Ertler
  • Albert-Reiner Glaap
  • Paul Goetsch
  • Fritz Peter Kirsch
  • Martin Kuester
  • Rolf Lohse
  • Hartmut Lutz
  • Ursula Mathis-Moser
  • Markus M. Müller
  • Andrea Oberhuber
  • Caroline Rosenthal
  • Dorothee Scholl
  • Waldemar Zacharasiewicz
  • Konrad Groß
  • Wolfgang Klooss
  • Reingard M. Nischik

Summary

When the former colonies of Canada East (Upper Canada), Canada West (Lower Canada), New Brunswick and Nova Scotia were merged in the British North America Act to form the Dominion of Canada on July 1, 1867, by resolution of the British Parliament in Westminster - originally one had Even a Kingdom of Canada is envisaged - the basis for a federal state structure is laid, which, although not yet fully sovereign, has more than one with the provinces of Ontario (Upper Canada), Quebec (Lower Canada), New Brunswick and Nova Scotia clearly defined territory and has a capital in Ottawa. Independence in foreign policy was not granted until 1931 with the Statute of Westminster, which guaranteed the former British colonies legislative autonomy, and constitutional sovereignty was only granted in 1982 by the Constitution Act. Two years after the British North America Act was passed, Manitoba joins the Dominion, British Columbia (1871), Prince Edward Island (1873), Alberta and Saskatchewan (1905) and finally Newfoundland (1949) join the Canadian Confederation with a time lag. Political decision-makers in French-speaking Lower Canada are as little involved in this development as the indigenous peoples of Canada, which suggests that the Canadian part of North America should henceforth be more strongly influenced by Anglophone interests than was already the case.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heinz Antor
  • Doris Eibl
  • Klaus-Dieter Ertler
  • Albert-Reiner Glaap
  • Paul Goetsch
  • Fritz Peter Kirsch
  • Martin Kuester
  • Rolf Lohse
  • Hartmut Lutz
  • Ursula Mathis-Moser
  • Markus M. Müller
  • Andrea Oberhuber
  • Caroline Rosenthal
  • Dorothee Scholl
  • Waldemar Zacharasiewicz
  • Konrad Groß
  • Wolfgang Klooss
  • Reingard M. Nischik

There are no affiliations available